X-Men 30th Anniversary Promotion Featuring Polaroid Holograms

Taddeo_X-men-30th-anniversary-X-men-VOL2-25The X-Men 30th Anniversary marketing and merchandising concept was an extension of the previous years successful Spider-Man 30th Anniversary promotion which included a brand wide crossover story between multiple titles in the X-Men Family, merchandised covers featuring trading card sized Polaroid holograms glued directly to the books, an extensive press campaign and retailer in-store promotions.

The effect of the marketing was obvious as compared to previous and subsequent issues (See Comparison Chart Below).

By 1993 Holograms were appearing regularly in trading card sets, usually as “Chase Cards” – limited edition cards that would appear randomly in packs.  The most common holograms utilized were “Silver Holograms” which were cheaper to produce and did not feature the 3-D image depth of the thicker, more expensive Polaroid Holograms.

A X-Men brand trade dress was created to accommodate the application of Polaroid Holograms on each book in the brand family for the month.  Originally the idea was for a “Full Cover” hologram, but that proved far to expensive.  In lieu, a “Trading Card Size” hologram was utilized to capitalize on the value and rarity in the consumers mind of the Hologram Chase Cards, utilized in trading card sets.

Coincidentally, Polaorid Holograms were also utilized by John in various Fleer projects the following years including Fleer Spider-Man 1994 (Four Hologram Chase Cards), and Fleer Ultra Spider-Man 1995.

Title Sales Previous Issue Sales Increase Cover Price $ Increase
X-Factor (vol. 1) #75
X-Force (vol. 1) #25
Uncanny X-Men #304
X-Men (vol. 2) #25
Wolverine (vol. 2) #75
Excalibur (vol. 1) #71
Uncanny_X-Men_Vol_1_304_Wraparound_Cover
Uncanny X-Men #304
wolverine-75
Wolverine (vol. 2) #75
x-factor92
X-Factor (vol. 1) #75
X-force25
X-Force (vol. 1) #25

 

 

 

 

 

The “Fatal Attractions” storyline that appeared in the comics was a major X-Men Brand crossover written by Fabian Nicieza and Scott Lobdell.  The books were published by Marvel Comics in 1993. The campaign and story spanned the entire line of X-Comics at the time.  Sales of X-Men comics that year contributed to 1993, becoming most successful year in comics sales industry history, and Marvel’s most successful year as a company t o date.

Several elements of the Fatal Attractions storyline was influenced in the X-Men animated series. In the two-part episode “Sanctuary”, Magneto creates Asteroid M, a human-free orbiting space station, proving that Magneto wants to wipe out humanity after the events of Season One.

Fatal Attractions was loosely adapted into a video game entitled X-Men: Children of the Atom in 1994. Much like the comic book storyline, Magneto plans to unleash an electromagnetic pulse on the Earth that will disrupt the magnetic fields and create havoc on the world’s electrical systems, ushering in a Dark Age for the Earth’s non-mutant population. Unlike the storyline, where Magneto has the Acolytes on his side, Omega Red, the Sentinels, Silver Samurai, Spiral, and the Juggernaut joins forces with Magneto as he promises a mutant run planet.

The story has been collected into a trade paperback: X-Men: Fatal Attractions (January 1995, ISBN 0-7851-0065-2)

The story has been collected into a Omnibus Hardcover: X-Men: Fatal Attractions (816 pages, April 2012, ISBN 978-0785162452